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Marian L. Evatt, MD

Marian L. Evatt, MD

Emory University School of Medicine
Department of Neurology

12 Executive Parkway
Atlanta, GA 30329
Atlanta, GA 30329

Phone: 404-728-4952
mevatt@emory.edu

Assistant: Pamela Best
Phone: (404) 728-4952
pbest@emory.edu

Member Since: 2010


Title

Director, VA Parkinsons Consortium Center Director

Specialty/Subspecialty

Neurology

Clinical Interest(s)

Movement Disorders

Research Interest(s)

  • Vitamin D
  • Parkinsons disease
  • Dystonia - Botulinum toxin therapy
  • Nutrition

Current / Former SSCI Roles

About Marian L. Evatt, MD

Marian L. Evatt, MD, received her BS in mechanical engineering from MIT, then her medical degree from Emory University in Atlanta. After completing her neurology residency training at Duke University in Durham, N.C., she returned to Emory University for fellowship training in electrophysiology and movement disorders, and later completed her MS in clinical research. She is the assistant professor of neurology and director of the National VA Parkinson's Disease Consortium Center at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center. She also serves as director of the Emory Movement Disorders Clinical Trials Program as well as scientific advisor to the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation's Atlanta.

Evatt's research and sub-specialty interests focus on clinical research in movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, dystonia and tremor. In particular, her work examines the epidemiology of nutritional deficits in and the potential role of nutritional compounds (e.g., vitamin B12, and vitamin D) as neuroprotective or symptomatic therapies in movement disorders. Long active in clinical trials in Parkinson's disease, she is exploring the role of vitamin D in neurological disease and focusing on the epidemiological and interventional pilot studies that address the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the pathogenesis and/or progression of Parkinson's disease.

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